Standing with Kaepernick


 

So the camp is divided once again, and it comes as no surprise. We have what many would call an opportunity to make an impact with the boycott of the 2017 NFL football season. Like the proposed boycott of “Black Friday 2016” the “Standing with Kaepernick” boycott is being met with resistance from members within our black community. There is no clear consensus as to whether black people and her allies are “Standing with Kaepernick” or “Sitting in their Loveseat on Sunday”—le sigh.

Nearly every Black person and ally can agree that racism upsets him, but no one seems to be able to agree on what exactly to do about it.

We long to fight with the patience, valiance, and unity black activists were once known for—making a difference and paving the way for a better future. We want to fight and be organized like the demonstrators of the sixties--wherein we made so many important strides. However, outside of the formation of BLM, sharing the murders on our social media echo chambers, and sharing in a collective angst, no organized actions have taken place against institutional racism. So…what can we do about racism? We can stand with Kaepernick.   Black people and her allies can boycott the 2017-18 NFL football season for punishing Kaepernick for exercising his right to peaceful protest.

 

70% of players in the NFL are black, and it’s no secret just how much team owners and the organization profit from the athletic prowess of black men; yet, when Kaepernick exercised his right to protest by kneeling during the National Anthem, he was essentially black balled by the organization that still profits from his efforts as you read this article.

83% of the NFL fan base is white, but many of you are allies to the cause. Barack Obama was not elected without the assistance of whites, and our ancestors and grandparents did not fight without white brothers and sisters alongside. We CAN successfully protest the treatment of African American people in the NFL, and we CAN successfully protest the ill-treatment of African American people by law enforcement. 1

History has taught us when organizations lose money things change; however, many of us—even the educated amongst us, the young, and progressive “black elite” have grown cynical and unmotivated to participate in any forms of organized activism or politics with few exceptions.

One could become disillusioned and stop fighting for those who refuse to fight for themselves, but one has to know that there was division in the sixties.

There were those in the sixties who cowered in the corner and had “valid” reasons for not fighting for the rights they complained about not having. Even during the crucial battleground of the civil rights movement, there were those who were missing in action because, “Christians don’t fight…”, or because, “I have to go to work”, or “I like football” or “fill in the excuse…”.

To those of you who still have the fire, passion, yearning, and love in your spirit for a better world for all lives, please stand with Kaepernick for Black lives. Sit this season out until there are results. Protesting the treatment of Keapernick is symbolic, and the details of Kaepernick’s contract are irrelevant. This protest is vital to all of our rights to peacefully protest.

Hitler killed 6 million Jews, but he killed 11 million people in total. A corrupt government never stops with the target group. If you think you’re safe because you’re not black, please take a page out of history and reconsider your position. We have an opportunity to make a difference. Do not be dissuaded by unmotivated souls—do not let the fire go out. Do not let anyone talk you out of protesting in your very own interest. Fight oppression the way only you can, and do not be deterred in your efforts.2

 

 

1 http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/70-of-nfl-players-are-black-men-colin-kaepernick_us_57c7b12be4b07addc4114047

2 http://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/non-jewish-victims-of-the-holocaust


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